Wednesday, November 25, 2020

Cherrelle ‎Still In Love With You (Remix Post)

 

[from her 1991 album, "The Woman I Am"]

House Mix Version

Stephanie Mills ‎All Day, All Night (Remix Post)

 

[from her 1992 album, "Something Real"]

Extended Mix Version

Soulpower Mix Version

Alternative Mix Version
Crazy Dane Mix Version

Al B. Sure! Natalie (Remix Post)

 

[from his 1992 album, "Sexy Versus"]

Natalie (Elle En Veut) 12-Inch R&B Remix Version

Natalie (Je Vais Lui Donner) Acoustic 12-Inch Remix Version

Natalie (J'en Veux Encore) Rock 12-Inch Remix Version

Assorted Phlavors ‎Make Up Your Mind (Remix Post)

 


[from their 1996 self-titled album]

The Dave "Jam" Hall Flavor Remix Version

Hip Hop Drop Mix Version
Granhawkins Remix Version

Smooth Mind Blowin' (Remix Post)

 

[from her self-titled 1995 album]

Kenny "Smoove" Illmatic Mix Version

Kenny "Smoove" Laid Back Mix Version

Mr. Lee's Radio Chant Version

Wednesday, November 11, 2020

Nayobe I Love The Way You Love Me (Remix Post)

 

[from her 1990 album, "Promise Me"]

Nostaglic Mix Version
R&B Dance Mix Version
Teddy's Single Version

The Boys A Little Romance (Remix Post)


[from their 1988 album, "Messages From the Boys"]

House Mix Version

Extended Mix Version
Dub Version

Kiara The Best Of Me\This Time (Double Remix Post)


[from their 1988 album, "To Change And / Or Make A Difference"]

The Best of Me

Sax With a Woman Mix Version


This Time (with Shanice Wilson)

Extended Remix Version

Cherrelle Artificial Heart (Remix Post)

 

[from her 1985 album, "High Priority"]

Dance Remix Version

Pebbles featuring Salt-N-Pepa Backyard (Remix Post)

 

[from her 1990 album, "Always"]


Outta The Hood Version
Uptown Club Version
UPSO Mix Version
Brixton Club Mix Version

Thursday, November 5, 2020

David Lynn Jones

 

David Lynn Jones (born on January 15, 1950 in Bexar, Arkansas) is a country music singer-songwriter from the late-'80s\early '90s. In the '70s, he played bass in a local band called Freddy Morrison & the Bandana Blues; he also had minor success writing Randy Cornor's song, "Heart Don't Fail Me Now." 

In 1986, he wrote the song, "Living in the Promiseland" for Willie Nelson which became a number-one hit on Billboard's Hot Country Songs chart. Willie Nelson also recorded another one of David's songs, "When Times Were Good" (which featured Merle Haggard) on their 1987 duet album, "Seashores of Old Mexico."

In 1987, David was signed to a record deal with Mercury Records and released his debut studio album, "Hard Times on Easy Street" during that same year. The album peaked at #28 on Billboard's Top Country Albums chart.
The lead single, "Bonnie Jean (Little Sister)" became a hit, peaking at #10 on Billboard's Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 20 weeks.
The follow-up single, "High Ridin' Heroes" (featuring Waylon Jennings) peaked at #14 on Billboard's Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 19 weeks.
The last two singles from the album: "The Rogue" (which peaked at #36) and "Tonight In America" (which peaked at #66) were moderately successful on Billboard's Hot Country Singles chart.
In 1990, David released his sophomore album, "Wood, Wind, and Stone" which peaked at #66 on Billboard's Top Country Albums chart.
The lead single, "Lonely Town" didn't make Billboard's Hot Country Singles chart, but managed to top Billboard's Hot Country Radio Breakouts chart. The follow-up single, "I Feel a Change Comin' On" didn't chart, but a music video was made for the song.
In 1992, he released his third album, "Mixed Emotions" which didn't make the charts along with the singles: "Her Love Don't Lie" and "Louise."
Two years later in 1994, David released his last studio album to date, "Play by Ear" which also flopped on the charts. By the end of the '90s, he worked as a songwriter for Blue Water Music in additional to running a recording studio in Bexar, Arkansas.

In the 2000s, David became a victim of identity theft which made releasing additional albums difficult for fear that any royalty checks would be stolen by the perpetrators, who were later arrested for the crime.

In the 2010s, he formed a music group called David Lynn Jones and Friends which consists of seasoned musicians\performers who have a passion for music.

In 2017, he won a $2.1 million judgment against a local bank after the jury found that the bank had sold the master tapes to over 100 of his songs and recording equipment "without permission or cause" at a public auction. In 2020, his wife, Illa (whom he married in 2004) passed away at the age of 61.

To see the Facebook group age for David Lynn Jones and Friends, go to:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/421896587851414/

To see a video for "Bonnie Jean (Little Sister)," go to:

To see a video for "High Ridin' Heroes" (with Waylon Jennings), go to:
To see a video for "The Rogue," go to:
To see a video for "Tonight in America," go to:
To see a video for "Lonely Town," go to:
To see a video for "I Feel a Change Comin' On," go to:
To see a video for "Her Love Don't Lie," go to:
To see a video for "Louise," go to:

Joanie Keller

Joanie Keller (born in Wayne, Nebraska) is a country music singer from the late '90s\early 2000s. She first began performing with her father, Bob Haberer and his band, Night Shift as a child.

After graduating from high school, Joanie played in local clubs in Colorado before moving to Nashville, Tennessee to pursue a career as a country music singer.

In 1999, she relased her debut studio album, "Sparks Are Gonna Fly" on the Broken Bow Records label (which didn't appear to make the charts at all).  The album received mixed reviews from critics, with one critic saying that it was "too smooth and polished to grab the hard-core honkytonkers, but it's often too country for much of today's younger audience."

Her only charting single to date, "Three Little Teardrops" peaked at #66 on Billboard's Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart, staying on the chart for only a week in 2000. During that same year, she was featured on Damon Grey's song, "Way Back Home."


After that, she amicably parted ways with her record label when she refused to change her traditional style to a more contemporary one. In the mid-2000s, she independently released two albums: "It's Me Again" (in 2006) and "Me and Dad" (with her father, Bob in 2009).

According to research, Joanie performs in Nashville, Tennessee with the band, 45 RPM; she is also married to steel guitar player Mike Johnson and was inducted into the Nebraska Music Hall of Fame in 2009. 

To see a video for "Three Little Teardrops," go to:

Cheryl Lynn

 

Cheryl Lynn (born Lynda Cheryl Smith on March 11, 1957 in Los Angeles, California) is an R&B singer from the '70s and '80s.

Cheryl began her singing career as a young girl in church where her mother was a musical director and she continued with her congregation's adult choir. In 1976, she decided to pursue a career in acting and singing; she spent eight months with the national touring company of "The Wiz", starting out as a background vocalist and eventually earned the role of Evillene, the Wicked Witch of the West in the show.

During that time (at the behest of her manager), Cheryl auditioned for the television talent show series, "The Gong Show" where her version of Joe Cocker's song, "You Are So Beautiful" received a perfect score from the judges.

After the episode aired, she attracted interest from several record labels, including Columbia Records, who signed her to the label towards the end of 1977. She also performed backing vocals for albums by D.J. Rogers and Eddie Kendrick around that time as well.

In 1978, Cheryl released her self-titled debut album which peaked at #23 on the Billboard 200 and #5 on Billboard's Top R&B Albums chart. It was certified Gold by the RIAA.
Her debut single, "Got to Be Real" became her biggest and well-known hit song to date; the song topped Billboard's Hot Soul Singles chart for a week in January of 1979 and crossed over to the pop charts where it peaked at #12 on the Billboard Hot 100.

The song also peaked at #11 on Billboard's National Disco Action Top 40 chart (along with the tracks "Star Love" and "You Saved My Day"), staying on the chart for 29 weeks.

The follow-up single from the album, "Star Love" peaked at #20 on Billboard Hot 100 and #9 on Billboard's Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for 15 weeks. During that time, Cheryl provided vocals on rock music group Toto's song, "Georgy Porgy" (which reached the Top 20 on the R&B charts).

In 1979, she released her sophomore album, "In Love" which peaked at #167 on the Billboard 200 and #47 on Billboard's Top R&B Albums chart.

The lead single from the album, "I've Got Faith in You" peaked at #41 on Billboard's Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for 10 weeks.


The follow-up single, "Keep it Hot" peaked at #12 on Billboard's Disco Top 100 chart (along with the tracks "Hide It Away" and "I've Got Faith in You"), staying on the chart for 23 weeks.

In 1981, Cheryl released her third album, "In The Night" which peaked at #104 on the Billboard 200 and #14 on Billboard's Top R&B Albums chart. It was produced by Ray Parker Jr. and was certified Gold.
The lead single, "Shake It Up Tonight" peaked at #2 on Billboard's Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for 19 weeks. It also crossed over to the pop charts where it peaked at #20 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #5 on Billboard's Disco Top 100 chart, staying on the chart for 18 weeks.
The title song missed the Hot 100, but managed to peak at #79 on Billboard's Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for only 4 weeks.

In 1982, she released her fourth studio album, "Instant Love" which peaked at #133 on the Billboard 200 and #7 on Billboard's Top R&B Albums chart.

The title song peaked at #16 on Billboard's Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for 16 weeks. It also peaked at #5 on Billboard's Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles chart.


The follow-up single, "If This World Were Mine" (a duet with late R&B singer Luther Vandross) was a hit on the R&B charts, peaking at #4 on Billboard's Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for 16 weeks. The song missed the Hot 100, but managed to peak at #1 on Billboard's Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles chart.

The last single released from the album, "Look Before You Leap" peaked at #77 on Billboard's Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for 5 weeks. During the '80s, Cheryl provided backing vocals for artists such as Betty Wright, Ray Parker Jr., Greg Phillinganes, Steven & Sterling and Luther Vandross.

In 1983, Cheryl released her fifth album, "Preppie" which peaked at #161 on the Billboard 200 and #8 on Billboard's Top R&B Albums chart.

The lead single, "Preppie" peaked at #85 on Billboard's Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for only 4 weeks.


The follow-up single, "Encore" fared better on the charts, topping Billboard's Hot Soul Singles chart for a week in February of 1984, staying on the chart for 22 weeks. It was also a moderate hit on the pop charts, peaking at #69 on the Billboard Hot 100; it also peaked at #6 on Billboard's Dance/Top 80 chart, staying on the chart for 17 weeks.
The last single released from the album, "This Time" peaked at #49 on Billboard's Black Singles chart, staying on the chart for 10 weeks.

In 1985, Cheryl was featured on the soundtrack to the film, "Heavenly Bodies" with the track, "At Last Your Mine" (written by Michael Bolton) which managed to peak at #34 on Billboard's Hot Black Singles chart, staying on the chart for 10 weeks.
During that same year, she released her sixth studio album, "It's Gonna Be Right" which peaked at #56 on Billboard's Top R&B Albums chart, but missed the Billboard 200. It would also be her last album for Columbia Records.
The lead single, "Fidelity" was a moderate hit on the R&B charts, peaking at #25 on Billboard's Hot Black Singles chart, staying on the chart for 13 weeks.
The follow-up single, "Fade to Black" flopped, peaking at #85 on Billboard's Hot Black Singles chart, staying on the chart for only 3 weeks. In 1986, she was featured on the soundtrack to the film, "Armed and Dangerous" with the track, "Steppin' Into the Night."
In 1987, Cheryl released her seventh album, "Start Over" on Manhattan Records which peaked at #55 on Billboard's Top R&B Albums chart.
The lead single from the album, "New Dress" peaked at #34 on Billboard's Hot Black Singles chart, staying on the chart for 11 weeks.
The follow-up, "If You Were Mine" peaked at #11 on Billboard's Hot Black Singles chart, staying on the chart for 11 weeks; it also peaked at #28 on Billboard's Hot Dance\Club Play chart, staying on the chart for 7 weeks.
In 1989, she released her eighth studio album, "Whatever It Takes" on Virgin Records which peaked at #42 on Billboard's Top R&B Albums chart, making it her last charting album to date.
The lead single, "Every Time I Try to Say Goodbye" peaked at #7 on Billboard's Hot Black Singles, staying on the chart for 14 weeks, becoming Cheryl's last Top 10 hit on the R&B charts to date.
The follow-up single from the album, "Whatever It Takes" peaked at #26 on Billboard's Hot Black Singles chart, staying on the chart for 12 weeks.
In the '90s, Cheryl did session work for albums by artists such as Richard Marx, Rush Street, Paid Vacation and Luther Vandross' album, "Your Secret Love." In 1995, she released her ninth album, "Good Time" which was first released in Japan and the United Kingdom, and later in the United States as an imported CD.  The title track peaked at #96 on the U.K. Singles chart. In 1998, she performed on HBO's "Sinbad's Summer Soul Jam 4."

In the 2000s, she toured in Japan, did occasional gigs in the United States performing at charity events in Los Angeles and performed on the ABC network special, "The Disco Ball: A 30-Year Celebration" in 2003.

In 2004, she was featured on the soundtrack to the animated film, "Shark Tale" with the song, "Sweet Kind of Life." In 2005, "Got to Be Real" was inducted into the Dance Music Hall of Fame; the song also made the charts in the United Kingdom, peaking at #70 on the U.K. Singles chart.

Since then, Cheryl Lynn has kept a low profile writing music, but other than that, it's unknown what else she's currently up to these days.

To see a video for "Got To Be Real," go to:
To see a video for "Star Love," go to:
To see a video for "I've Got Faith in You," go to:
To see a video for "Shake It Up Tonight," go to:
To see a video for "In the Night," go to:
To see a video for "Instant Love," go to:
To see a video for "If This World Were Mine" (with Luther Vandross), go to:
To see a video for "Look Before You Leap," go to:
To see a video for "Preppie," go to:
To see a video for "Encore," go to:
To see a video for "This Time," go to:
To see a video for "At Last You're Mine" (from the "Heavenly Bodies" soundtrack), go to:
To see a video for "Fidelity," go to:
To see a video for "Fade to Black," go to:
To see a video for "New Dress," go to:
To see a video for "If You Were Mine," go to:
To see a video for "Every Time I Try to Say Goodbye," go to:
To see a video for "Whatever It Takes," go to:
To see a video for "Good Time," go to:


As a bonus, here is a video of Toto's song, "Georgy Porgy" (featuring backing vocals from Cheryl Lynn), go to: